Trol group.Table S1 Primers and cycling conditions for RT-PCR.(DOC

Trol group.Table S1 Primers and cycling conditions for RT-PCR.(DOC)AcknowledgmentsWe thank Duanqing Pei Ph.D. from Guangzhou Institute of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Sciences (GIBH) for providing the mouse ESC line.Author ContributionsConceived and designed the experiments: QSZ. Performed the experiments: DBO DZ YJ XTL. Analyzed the data: JWT WGG HTW. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: FFS YH. Wrote the paper: DBO DZ.Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis AssayCell apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC apoptosis assay kit as previously reported [34]. Cells were
Chronic pain is associated with changes in brain structure and function. Multiple studies have now reported decreased brain grey matter and abnormal cortical function associated with chronic pain, and the magnitude of these changes may be related to the duration and the intensity of chronic pain. While changes in some brain regions are associated with specific pain 18334597 conditions, many studies report changes in common areas involved in pain modulation, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC) (for reviews see [1,2]. Interestingly, the PFC has also been implicated in depression and anxiety, both of which are co-morbid with chronic pain.Chronic pain induces and actively maintains pathological changes in the PFC: The induction of nerve injury in normal rats results in the development of hypersensitivity to sensory stimuli and in decreased grey matter in the PFC several months post-injury [3]. Furthermore, reducing chronic pain in humans reverses pain-related changes in PFC structure and function [4,5]. However, the mechanisms underlying chronic pain-induced neuroplasticity are currently not understood. Epigenetic modulation of gene expression in response to experience and environmental changes is both dynamic and reversible. Covalent modification of DNA by methylation is a critical epigenetic mechanism resulting in altered gene expression. The recognition of the role of DNA methylation in human disease started in oncology but now extents to other disciplines includingChanges in DNA Methylation following Nerve Injuryneurological disorders, and modulation by DNA methylation is associated with abnormal behavior and pathological gene expression in the central nervous system (CNS). For example, ML-281 adverse environments early in life result in stable pathological changes in methylation and gene function in the adult [6,7,8,9,10] that are reversible with epigenetic drugs [11,12]. A plausible working hypothesis is that JWH-133 long-term changes in DNA methylation in the brain embed signals from transient injury or other exposures to alter genome function in the brain, resulting in either the chronification of pain or contributing to the co-morbid pathologies associated with chronic pain. If this hypothesis is correct, then DNA methylation changes in the brain should be detectable long after exposure to the initial peripheral injury that triggered the chronic pain. The objectives of the current study were a) to determine if a peripheral nerve injury that triggers long-term, persistent behavioural signs of neuropathic pain and a decrease in grey matter in the PFC several months post-injury [4] also triggers region-specific changes in DNA methylation in the brain that can be detected long after the initial injury and b) to determine whether these changes are sensitive to an environmental manipulation that attenuates pain. The primary findings are a) 5? months followi.Trol group.Table S1 Primers and cycling conditions for RT-PCR.(DOC)AcknowledgmentsWe thank Duanqing Pei Ph.D. from Guangzhou Institute of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Sciences (GIBH) for providing the mouse ESC line.Author ContributionsConceived and designed the experiments: QSZ. Performed the experiments: DBO DZ YJ XTL. Analyzed the data: JWT WGG HTW. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: FFS YH. Wrote the paper: DBO DZ.Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis AssayCell apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC apoptosis assay kit as previously reported [34]. Cells were
Chronic pain is associated with changes in brain structure and function. Multiple studies have now reported decreased brain grey matter and abnormal cortical function associated with chronic pain, and the magnitude of these changes may be related to the duration and the intensity of chronic pain. While changes in some brain regions are associated with specific pain 18334597 conditions, many studies report changes in common areas involved in pain modulation, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC) (for reviews see [1,2]. Interestingly, the PFC has also been implicated in depression and anxiety, both of which are co-morbid with chronic pain.Chronic pain induces and actively maintains pathological changes in the PFC: The induction of nerve injury in normal rats results in the development of hypersensitivity to sensory stimuli and in decreased grey matter in the PFC several months post-injury [3]. Furthermore, reducing chronic pain in humans reverses pain-related changes in PFC structure and function [4,5]. However, the mechanisms underlying chronic pain-induced neuroplasticity are currently not understood. Epigenetic modulation of gene expression in response to experience and environmental changes is both dynamic and reversible. Covalent modification of DNA by methylation is a critical epigenetic mechanism resulting in altered gene expression. The recognition of the role of DNA methylation in human disease started in oncology but now extents to other disciplines includingChanges in DNA Methylation following Nerve Injuryneurological disorders, and modulation by DNA methylation is associated with abnormal behavior and pathological gene expression in the central nervous system (CNS). For example, adverse environments early in life result in stable pathological changes in methylation and gene function in the adult [6,7,8,9,10] that are reversible with epigenetic drugs [11,12]. A plausible working hypothesis is that long-term changes in DNA methylation in the brain embed signals from transient injury or other exposures to alter genome function in the brain, resulting in either the chronification of pain or contributing to the co-morbid pathologies associated with chronic pain. If this hypothesis is correct, then DNA methylation changes in the brain should be detectable long after exposure to the initial peripheral injury that triggered the chronic pain. The objectives of the current study were a) to determine if a peripheral nerve injury that triggers long-term, persistent behavioural signs of neuropathic pain and a decrease in grey matter in the PFC several months post-injury [4] also triggers region-specific changes in DNA methylation in the brain that can be detected long after the initial injury and b) to determine whether these changes are sensitive to an environmental manipulation that attenuates pain. The primary findings are a) 5? months followi.

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