Tion, thereby elevating mood states and likewise diminishing negative neuroendocrine and

Tion, thereby Chloroquine (diphosphate)MedChemExpress Chloroquine (diphosphate) elevating mood states and Chloroquine (diphosphate) biological activity likewise diminishing negative neuroendocrine and inflammatory responses.1 Because of the associated induction of relaxation, self-awareness, and mindfulness, yoga practice confers psychological benefits as well, including reduced anxiety and depression.2 Specific mental health outcomes, including quality of life, stress, mood states, quality of?2010 The Author(s) Correspondence to Gina K. Alexander, PhD, MPH, RN, Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Texas Christian University, Box 298620, Fort Worth, TX 76129 ([email protected]).Alexander et al.Pagesleep, self-esteem, overall psychological well-being, and treatment of substance abuse, improve with yoga practice, as reported in the literature.3?NIH-PA Author Manuscript Methods NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptThe health literature focused on yoga practice among individuals with diabetes includes reports of beneficial outcomes resulting from divergent intervention protocols. Some discuss the implementation of an intensive protocol of supervised residential yoga intervention.11?6 Others describe significant results with a protocol of weekly yoga sessions ranging from 8 weeks to 6 months; multiple studies described expectations for daily home practice.7,9,17?0 Regardless of the particular protocol, individuals who regularly practice yoga reap the greatest benefits; some consider consistency to be the most important factor in mind-body therapies.8 Despite the proliferation of yoga-based studies in recent years, few have examined the longterm benefits of yoga practice or the challenges of maintaining yoga practice over time. The purpose of this study was to describe firsthand experiences with yoga as shared by adults with or at risk for type 2 diabetes and to examine their beliefs regarding maintenance of yoga practice over time.Study Design The current qualitative study was a follow-up to 2 randomized controlled trials, one for men and women with type 2 diabetes (Diabetes and Yoga Study [DAYS]) and the other for healthy women at risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease (Women’s Health and Yoga Study [WHYS]). Although the target population for these “parent studies” was different, the 2 studies had concurrent study enrollment and followed the same yoga intervention protocol. Further details regarding the DAYS and WHYS designs are described elsewhere.21?3 Human Subjects Protection The University of Virginia Institutional Review Board for Health Sciences Research (IRBHSR) approved the original study protocols and all protocol modifications for the current study, including guidelines for ensuring privacy and confidentiality. Written informed consent with approval for future contact was obtained from participants prior to study enrollment. Verbal consent to audio recording was obtained from interviewees prior to beginning the interviews. Yoga Intervention: the Parent Studies The DAYS and WHYS intervention protocol included 2 group sessions of supervised yoga instruction per week, in addition to expected home practice, over an 8-week period. The focus was Iyengar yoga, known for its gentle approach and emphasis on postures and breathing exercises easily tailored for beginners and those with or at risk for chronic illness.17,24 Iyengar yoga incorporates props such as blocks, belts, blankets, and chairs, offering support for yoga positions to prevent strain or overstretching.25An ideal role model for participants, the instructor beg.Tion, thereby elevating mood states and likewise diminishing negative neuroendocrine and inflammatory responses.1 Because of the associated induction of relaxation, self-awareness, and mindfulness, yoga practice confers psychological benefits as well, including reduced anxiety and depression.2 Specific mental health outcomes, including quality of life, stress, mood states, quality of?2010 The Author(s) Correspondence to Gina K. Alexander, PhD, MPH, RN, Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Texas Christian University, Box 298620, Fort Worth, TX 76129 ([email protected]).Alexander et al.Pagesleep, self-esteem, overall psychological well-being, and treatment of substance abuse, improve with yoga practice, as reported in the literature.3?NIH-PA Author Manuscript Methods NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptThe health literature focused on yoga practice among individuals with diabetes includes reports of beneficial outcomes resulting from divergent intervention protocols. Some discuss the implementation of an intensive protocol of supervised residential yoga intervention.11?6 Others describe significant results with a protocol of weekly yoga sessions ranging from 8 weeks to 6 months; multiple studies described expectations for daily home practice.7,9,17?0 Regardless of the particular protocol, individuals who regularly practice yoga reap the greatest benefits; some consider consistency to be the most important factor in mind-body therapies.8 Despite the proliferation of yoga-based studies in recent years, few have examined the longterm benefits of yoga practice or the challenges of maintaining yoga practice over time. The purpose of this study was to describe firsthand experiences with yoga as shared by adults with or at risk for type 2 diabetes and to examine their beliefs regarding maintenance of yoga practice over time.Study Design The current qualitative study was a follow-up to 2 randomized controlled trials, one for men and women with type 2 diabetes (Diabetes and Yoga Study [DAYS]) and the other for healthy women at risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease (Women’s Health and Yoga Study [WHYS]). Although the target population for these “parent studies” was different, the 2 studies had concurrent study enrollment and followed the same yoga intervention protocol. Further details regarding the DAYS and WHYS designs are described elsewhere.21?3 Human Subjects Protection The University of Virginia Institutional Review Board for Health Sciences Research (IRBHSR) approved the original study protocols and all protocol modifications for the current study, including guidelines for ensuring privacy and confidentiality. Written informed consent with approval for future contact was obtained from participants prior to study enrollment. Verbal consent to audio recording was obtained from interviewees prior to beginning the interviews. Yoga Intervention: the Parent Studies The DAYS and WHYS intervention protocol included 2 group sessions of supervised yoga instruction per week, in addition to expected home practice, over an 8-week period. The focus was Iyengar yoga, known for its gentle approach and emphasis on postures and breathing exercises easily tailored for beginners and those with or at risk for chronic illness.17,24 Iyengar yoga incorporates props such as blocks, belts, blankets, and chairs, offering support for yoga positions to prevent strain or overstretching.25An ideal role model for participants, the instructor beg.

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