Rhetorical functions of language, typography and editorial voice as well as

Rhetorical functions of language, typography and editorial voice as well as the use of such radical literary tactics as exposure, ridicule and critique. This article does not merely aim to point up the similarities between The Lancet and its political contemporaries; it intends to show how such stylistic devices were marshalled in the pursuit of a specific political agenda. Of course splenetic prose was not the sole preserve of the radical `left’ and neither was it particularly novel. Similar tactics had been in use since the later 1700s by `King and Country’ Tories, a position from which Wakley’s mentor and collaborator, William Cobbett, had only moved in 1806.14 However, during the early decades of the nineteenth century it was the radical and revolutionary press which made this style their own, and it was these conventions that Wakley sought to emulate. This was particularly true of his predilection for insult and defamation, and the main body of this article comprises a detailed analysis of a trial for libel in 1828 between Wakely and the Guy’s Hospital surgeon, Bransby Cooper. Through a close analysis of Wakley’s rhetorical, legal and performative strategies, as well as a critical reading of a number of contemporary satirical prints, it demonstrates how this trial functioned as the platform for a much broader critique of the established medical `system’ and provided a powerful means for Wakley to align himself with the cultures of popular radicalism. However, whatever parallels and connections Wakley sought to draw between the medical and the political, the reality was rather more complex. In the final section,567. Smith, The Politics of Language, 1791 ?819 (CP 472295MedChemExpress Tulathromycin A Oxford, 1984); I. McCalman, Radical Underworld: Prophets, Revolutionaries and Pornographers, 1795?1840 (Cambridge, 1988); J. A. Epstein, Radical Expression: Political Language, Ritual and Symbol in England, 1790 ?1850 (Oxford, 1994); E. Hadley, Melodramatic Tactics: Theatricalised Dissent in the English13O. 12ibid.,Marketplace, 1800 ?1885 (Stanford, 1995); L. Nattrass, William Cobbett: The Politics of Style (Cambridge, 1995); K. Gilmartin, Print Politics: The Press and Radical Opposition in Early Nineteenth-Century England (Cambridge, 1996). 14For example, see J. J. Sack, From Jacobite to Conservative: Reaction and TGR-1202 chemical information Orthodoxy in Britain, c.1760 ?832 (Cambridge, 1993).Social HistoryVOL.39 :NO.therefore, this article examines the tensions and ambiguities within Wakley’s political persona by reading them against the altered circumstances of the 1820s, particularly the rise of a more philosophic reformism. In so doing, it seeks not merely to place political radicalism at the heart of contemporary medical culture but, more ambitiously perhaps, to establish a more prominent place for medicine in accounts of the history of early nineteenth-century reform, as a potential bridge between the popular radicalism of the immediate post-war years and the reformist utilitarianism of the 1830s.WAKLEY, COBBETT AND RADICAL STYLEThere was little in Thomas Wakley’s early upbringing to suggest a natural inclination towards political radicalism, for he was born in 1795 into that bulwark of pre-modern political order, the prosperous farming family.15 One of eleven children and the youngest of eight sons, he attended boarding school in Somerset, followed by a series of apprenticeships with local apothecaries and surgeons, enrolling as a student at the United Hospitals Medical School of Guy’s and St Tho.Rhetorical functions of language, typography and editorial voice as well as the use of such radical literary tactics as exposure, ridicule and critique. This article does not merely aim to point up the similarities between The Lancet and its political contemporaries; it intends to show how such stylistic devices were marshalled in the pursuit of a specific political agenda. Of course splenetic prose was not the sole preserve of the radical `left’ and neither was it particularly novel. Similar tactics had been in use since the later 1700s by `King and Country’ Tories, a position from which Wakley’s mentor and collaborator, William Cobbett, had only moved in 1806.14 However, during the early decades of the nineteenth century it was the radical and revolutionary press which made this style their own, and it was these conventions that Wakley sought to emulate. This was particularly true of his predilection for insult and defamation, and the main body of this article comprises a detailed analysis of a trial for libel in 1828 between Wakely and the Guy’s Hospital surgeon, Bransby Cooper. Through a close analysis of Wakley’s rhetorical, legal and performative strategies, as well as a critical reading of a number of contemporary satirical prints, it demonstrates how this trial functioned as the platform for a much broader critique of the established medical `system’ and provided a powerful means for Wakley to align himself with the cultures of popular radicalism. However, whatever parallels and connections Wakley sought to draw between the medical and the political, the reality was rather more complex. In the final section,567. Smith, The Politics of Language, 1791 ?819 (Oxford, 1984); I. McCalman, Radical Underworld: Prophets, Revolutionaries and Pornographers, 1795?1840 (Cambridge, 1988); J. A. Epstein, Radical Expression: Political Language, Ritual and Symbol in England, 1790 ?1850 (Oxford, 1994); E. Hadley, Melodramatic Tactics: Theatricalised Dissent in the English13O. 12ibid.,Marketplace, 1800 ?1885 (Stanford, 1995); L. Nattrass, William Cobbett: The Politics of Style (Cambridge, 1995); K. Gilmartin, Print Politics: The Press and Radical Opposition in Early Nineteenth-Century England (Cambridge, 1996). 14For example, see J. J. Sack, From Jacobite to Conservative: Reaction and Orthodoxy in Britain, c.1760 ?832 (Cambridge, 1993).Social HistoryVOL.39 :NO.therefore, this article examines the tensions and ambiguities within Wakley’s political persona by reading them against the altered circumstances of the 1820s, particularly the rise of a more philosophic reformism. In so doing, it seeks not merely to place political radicalism at the heart of contemporary medical culture but, more ambitiously perhaps, to establish a more prominent place for medicine in accounts of the history of early nineteenth-century reform, as a potential bridge between the popular radicalism of the immediate post-war years and the reformist utilitarianism of the 1830s.WAKLEY, COBBETT AND RADICAL STYLEThere was little in Thomas Wakley’s early upbringing to suggest a natural inclination towards political radicalism, for he was born in 1795 into that bulwark of pre-modern political order, the prosperous farming family.15 One of eleven children and the youngest of eight sons, he attended boarding school in Somerset, followed by a series of apprenticeships with local apothecaries and surgeons, enrolling as a student at the United Hospitals Medical School of Guy’s and St Tho.

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