Are a useful method for gaining insight into phenomena where little

Are a useful method for gaining insight into phenomena where little is known [44]. When focus group data has been collected from multiple groups and multiple sites, researchers can have increased confidence in the reliability and validity of the findings [45]. The focus groups were guided by following questions. (1) Perceptions of Professional Socialization. (a) What comes to mind when you hear the phrase “professional socialization”? (b) Share memories of your experiences becoming socialized into the role of Licensed Practical Nurse and developing your identity in this role. (c) How is the experience of developing your new role and identity as a Registered Nurse the same? How is it different? (2) Formal Academic Experiences: Online Classes and Clinical Practicums. (a) Talk about experiences you have had so far in your online university classes where you “felt like” a Registered Nurse and not a Licensed Practical Nurse? Have there been times in your online4 [54] (page 85) maintained by both moderators during and immediately following the sessions buy L-660711 sodium salt further increased the dependability of our findings. Practical issues such as organizing groups at a time and place to minimize disruption and avoiding power differential dynamics [55] were addressed. The groups were held when participants, who were normally separated by distance, were together in the same city for a required practicum experience. They were held at change of shift in lieu of a post conference. Knowing the power differential between students and teachers, moderators who did not have teaching responsibilities in the Post LPN to BN program were chosen to facilitate the focus groups. Instructors were not present during any of the discussions and had no involvement with the transcript data. Participants were recruited through a Letter of Invitation sent via email by a Research Assistant who was also not involved with the program. Four focus groups were held with 5 to 9 participants each. All the students who were invited chose to participate. We reasoned that this may have been because they were all from out of town and appreciated an opportunity to interact and share their views. Pseudonyms ensured participant confidentiality. Full ethical approval was granted by the university. The following two overarching themes emerged from analyzing the data. First, Post LPN to BN students need little, if any, further legitimation to affirm their identities as “nurse.” Second, practicum interactions with instructors and new clinical experiences are key socializing agents.Nursing Research and Practice They talked about opportunities where demonstrating professional authority in their workplace further established their identity as “nurse”: “Working your first night shift . . . in your new role. The culture of night shift–it’s different.” “The first time I cared for a palliative patient and was there when they passed. Talking with the family. My first job that I had as an LPN, I was alone on the floor as the only official nurse for more than half of my shift. I had the full responsibility of all 60 residents in my care . . . that all happened as an LPN.” From the Post LPN to BN students’ AC220 supplement perspective, the notion that socialization into the role of “nurse” would occur for them at this point in their career was insulting: “I almost feel a little bit insulted to think that I would feel any less professional as an LPN than I do as an RN. I feel equally professional in both roles.” “My buddy nurse ac.Are a useful method for gaining insight into phenomena where little is known [44]. When focus group data has been collected from multiple groups and multiple sites, researchers can have increased confidence in the reliability and validity of the findings [45]. The focus groups were guided by following questions. (1) Perceptions of Professional Socialization. (a) What comes to mind when you hear the phrase “professional socialization”? (b) Share memories of your experiences becoming socialized into the role of Licensed Practical Nurse and developing your identity in this role. (c) How is the experience of developing your new role and identity as a Registered Nurse the same? How is it different? (2) Formal Academic Experiences: Online Classes and Clinical Practicums. (a) Talk about experiences you have had so far in your online university classes where you “felt like” a Registered Nurse and not a Licensed Practical Nurse? Have there been times in your online4 [54] (page 85) maintained by both moderators during and immediately following the sessions further increased the dependability of our findings. Practical issues such as organizing groups at a time and place to minimize disruption and avoiding power differential dynamics [55] were addressed. The groups were held when participants, who were normally separated by distance, were together in the same city for a required practicum experience. They were held at change of shift in lieu of a post conference. Knowing the power differential between students and teachers, moderators who did not have teaching responsibilities in the Post LPN to BN program were chosen to facilitate the focus groups. Instructors were not present during any of the discussions and had no involvement with the transcript data. Participants were recruited through a Letter of Invitation sent via email by a Research Assistant who was also not involved with the program. Four focus groups were held with 5 to 9 participants each. All the students who were invited chose to participate. We reasoned that this may have been because they were all from out of town and appreciated an opportunity to interact and share their views. Pseudonyms ensured participant confidentiality. Full ethical approval was granted by the university. The following two overarching themes emerged from analyzing the data. First, Post LPN to BN students need little, if any, further legitimation to affirm their identities as “nurse.” Second, practicum interactions with instructors and new clinical experiences are key socializing agents.Nursing Research and Practice They talked about opportunities where demonstrating professional authority in their workplace further established their identity as “nurse”: “Working your first night shift . . . in your new role. The culture of night shift–it’s different.” “The first time I cared for a palliative patient and was there when they passed. Talking with the family. My first job that I had as an LPN, I was alone on the floor as the only official nurse for more than half of my shift. I had the full responsibility of all 60 residents in my care . . . that all happened as an LPN.” From the Post LPN to BN students’ perspective, the notion that socialization into the role of “nurse” would occur for them at this point in their career was insulting: “I almost feel a little bit insulted to think that I would feel any less professional as an LPN than I do as an RN. I feel equally professional in both roles.” “My buddy nurse ac.

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