Focus on improving health behaviors such as nutrition and physical activity.

Focus on improving health behaviors such as nutrition and physical activity. This session included a discussion of the guidelines or recommendations for follow up and cancer surveillance. The second session delved into psychosocial, work, family, financial and economic changes occurring after treatment. The third session explored the potential for personal growth and advocacy after treatment. The Wait Control group received the same intervention after a 3-month waiting period. Both groups received monthly face-to-face followup with an assigned oncology nurse with study participation lasting 6 months. Results showed significant differences in quality of life outcomes between Experimental and Wait Control group that were sustained over time. While effective, the study sample comprised less than 5 of Latinas who identified the major barrier to participation being language. Subsequently, the BCEi was cited in a recent Cochrane review as an effective intervention for breast cancer survivors [18]. The BCEi was also evaluated by the Research Tested Interventions in Practice (RTIP) program at the National Cancer Institute and recommended for widespread public distribution [19]. Subsequently, the BCEi was adapted for older, rural and African-American breast cancer survivors [20,21]. In an effort to extend survivorship interventions to LBCS and to reduce language, linguistic and cultural HIV-1 integrase inhibitor 2 web barriers, the followingWomens Health (Lond Engl). Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 January 01.Meneses et al.Pagereports the process of adapting the BCEI for LBCS through translation, cognitive interview and pilot testing.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptMaterials methodsThe authors received appropriate Institutional Review Board approval from the Department of Health in the State of Florida and the University of Alabama at Birmingham. This present study used a descriptive design using cognitive interview and survey. First, the BCEi education print materials were professionally translated. Second, an evaluation of the cultural relevance and Mangafodipir (trisodium) site readability of the Spanish translation was established. And third, a pilot evaluation of the satisfaction and usefulness of the education materials was conducted. Figure 1 is a schematic of the adaptation process. Certified translation of the BCEi print materials The BCEi print materials were contained in a 133 page binder that was divided into six modules. Thirty-seven Tip Sheets of short bulleted suggestions accompanied the modules. The BCEi print materials were used by trained oncology nurses for three, one-on-one teaching and support sessions. Teaching materials were organized within a quality of life conceptual model recognizing the interaction of physical, psychological, social and spiritual well-being, and emphasized patient self-management in survivorship care. Modules 1 2 reviewed common physical late effects such as cancer-related fatigue, lymphedema, pain, menopausal symptoms, sleep problems, sexual function and fertility and self-management techniques. Modules 3 4 examined strategies to promote healthy lifestyle behaviors such as physical activity, nutrition and diet and cancer surveillance. Modules 5 6 explored psychological late effects and personal growth after breast cancer. All the English version print materials of the BCEi are available for public use at the Research Tested Interventions into Practice (RTIP) website [19]. The BCEi print materials were tr.Focus on improving health behaviors such as nutrition and physical activity. This session included a discussion of the guidelines or recommendations for follow up and cancer surveillance. The second session delved into psychosocial, work, family, financial and economic changes occurring after treatment. The third session explored the potential for personal growth and advocacy after treatment. The Wait Control group received the same intervention after a 3-month waiting period. Both groups received monthly face-to-face followup with an assigned oncology nurse with study participation lasting 6 months. Results showed significant differences in quality of life outcomes between Experimental and Wait Control group that were sustained over time. While effective, the study sample comprised less than 5 of Latinas who identified the major barrier to participation being language. Subsequently, the BCEi was cited in a recent Cochrane review as an effective intervention for breast cancer survivors [18]. The BCEi was also evaluated by the Research Tested Interventions in Practice (RTIP) program at the National Cancer Institute and recommended for widespread public distribution [19]. Subsequently, the BCEi was adapted for older, rural and African-American breast cancer survivors [20,21]. In an effort to extend survivorship interventions to LBCS and to reduce language, linguistic and cultural barriers, the followingWomens Health (Lond Engl). Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 January 01.Meneses et al.Pagereports the process of adapting the BCEI for LBCS through translation, cognitive interview and pilot testing.Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptMaterials methodsThe authors received appropriate Institutional Review Board approval from the Department of Health in the State of Florida and the University of Alabama at Birmingham. This present study used a descriptive design using cognitive interview and survey. First, the BCEi education print materials were professionally translated. Second, an evaluation of the cultural relevance and readability of the Spanish translation was established. And third, a pilot evaluation of the satisfaction and usefulness of the education materials was conducted. Figure 1 is a schematic of the adaptation process. Certified translation of the BCEi print materials The BCEi print materials were contained in a 133 page binder that was divided into six modules. Thirty-seven Tip Sheets of short bulleted suggestions accompanied the modules. The BCEi print materials were used by trained oncology nurses for three, one-on-one teaching and support sessions. Teaching materials were organized within a quality of life conceptual model recognizing the interaction of physical, psychological, social and spiritual well-being, and emphasized patient self-management in survivorship care. Modules 1 2 reviewed common physical late effects such as cancer-related fatigue, lymphedema, pain, menopausal symptoms, sleep problems, sexual function and fertility and self-management techniques. Modules 3 4 examined strategies to promote healthy lifestyle behaviors such as physical activity, nutrition and diet and cancer surveillance. Modules 5 6 explored psychological late effects and personal growth after breast cancer. All the English version print materials of the BCEi are available for public use at the Research Tested Interventions into Practice (RTIP) website [19]. The BCEi print materials were tr.

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