Uthor ManuscriptGlob Public Health. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 August 01.Huang

Uthor ManuscriptGlob Public Health. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 August 01.Huang et al.PageCreate a supportive local environment–JZ staff worked to create a supportive local environment for sex workers through relationship building and HMPL-013 web social networking activities across four specific types of interpersonal relationships which are most closely linked to FSWs’ daily living and working situation: relationships within sex work, relationships with non-FSW neighbours, relationships and advocacy work with the local police and other stakeholders and relationships between JZ staff and FSW. In undertaking these activities, JZ also created an increasingly supportive local environment in which to continue their programmatic work, further supporting the success of the programme. Development of mutual support within sex work–In China, sex work is a competitive business and FSWs lack the collective consciousness noted in other global settings (Zheng, 2009). These competitive framework and lack of collective consciousness alongside social stigma and anti-prostitution laws present significant obstacles for community building among FSWs. To address this problem, the JZ programme focused substantial efforts on improving relationships among FSWs, among managers and between FSWs and their managers. Networking activities included inviting FSWs and managers to the JZ clinic for chatting, dining out for group dinners, having Karaoke and dance parties in entertainment venues and taking fieldtrips outside of the city for outdoor activities such as visiting local parks and mountains. As JZ’s programmatic work was limited in scale and frequency due to the intense time demands on the small staff, these activities outside of sex work venues provided opportunities for social networking among FSWs and worked as important ways to build collective consciousness (described below), which are rarely seen in other FSW intervention programmes in China. Relevant topics for women’s lives were regularly embedded in these activities including reproductive health concerns and strategies to maintain good business in sex work while keeping safe. The social support and social networking activities facilitated by JZ also served an overarching goal of building critical consciousness among FSWs. Specific activities that helped build critical consciousness included JZ’s facilitation of the `photos of our life’ project to encourage women to photograph their daily lives and share with others and the self-support ML240MedChemExpress ML240 groups JZ formed among women. These small-scale self-support groups were initiated in each neighbourhood and led by key FSW peer educators. Peer educators recruited FSW participants across a range of different types of entertainment venue settings (e.g. street standers, salons, Internet, karaoke bar). These groups meet one to two times per month to share business information, discuss new issues emerging in their neighbourhoods and provide support for neighbourhood-related problems such as robbery and violence. Information and emergent issues discussed within these groups also served to inform the tailored IEC materials JZ created and distributed during outreach activities. Improving relationship between FSW and non-SW neighbours–As noted by quite a few FSW, friendly (non-FSW) neighbours could help you watch your doors and let clients know you have a social support system, which would reduce the risk of violence and robbery. Conversely, poor relationships with neigh.Uthor ManuscriptGlob Public Health. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 August 01.Huang et al.PageCreate a supportive local environment–JZ staff worked to create a supportive local environment for sex workers through relationship building and social networking activities across four specific types of interpersonal relationships which are most closely linked to FSWs’ daily living and working situation: relationships within sex work, relationships with non-FSW neighbours, relationships and advocacy work with the local police and other stakeholders and relationships between JZ staff and FSW. In undertaking these activities, JZ also created an increasingly supportive local environment in which to continue their programmatic work, further supporting the success of the programme. Development of mutual support within sex work–In China, sex work is a competitive business and FSWs lack the collective consciousness noted in other global settings (Zheng, 2009). These competitive framework and lack of collective consciousness alongside social stigma and anti-prostitution laws present significant obstacles for community building among FSWs. To address this problem, the JZ programme focused substantial efforts on improving relationships among FSWs, among managers and between FSWs and their managers. Networking activities included inviting FSWs and managers to the JZ clinic for chatting, dining out for group dinners, having Karaoke and dance parties in entertainment venues and taking fieldtrips outside of the city for outdoor activities such as visiting local parks and mountains. As JZ’s programmatic work was limited in scale and frequency due to the intense time demands on the small staff, these activities outside of sex work venues provided opportunities for social networking among FSWs and worked as important ways to build collective consciousness (described below), which are rarely seen in other FSW intervention programmes in China. Relevant topics for women’s lives were regularly embedded in these activities including reproductive health concerns and strategies to maintain good business in sex work while keeping safe. The social support and social networking activities facilitated by JZ also served an overarching goal of building critical consciousness among FSWs. Specific activities that helped build critical consciousness included JZ’s facilitation of the `photos of our life’ project to encourage women to photograph their daily lives and share with others and the self-support groups JZ formed among women. These small-scale self-support groups were initiated in each neighbourhood and led by key FSW peer educators. Peer educators recruited FSW participants across a range of different types of entertainment venue settings (e.g. street standers, salons, Internet, karaoke bar). These groups meet one to two times per month to share business information, discuss new issues emerging in their neighbourhoods and provide support for neighbourhood-related problems such as robbery and violence. Information and emergent issues discussed within these groups also served to inform the tailored IEC materials JZ created and distributed during outreach activities. Improving relationship between FSW and non-SW neighbours–As noted by quite a few FSW, friendly (non-FSW) neighbours could help you watch your doors and let clients know you have a social support system, which would reduce the risk of violence and robbery. Conversely, poor relationships with neigh.

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