Ll is exposed to a dcEF (E = 10 mV/mm) where the

Ll is exposed to a dcEF (E = 10 mV/mm) where the anode is located at x = 0 and the GW 4064 site cathode at x = 400 m. It is supposed that the cell is attracted to the cathode pole. At the beginning, the cell is placed near the anode and far from the cathode pole. The cell migrates along the dcEF towards the surface in which the cathode pole is located. Depending on EF strength, the ultimate location of the cell centroid will be different so that in this case (E = 10 mV/mm) the cell centroid keeps moving around an IEP located at x = 379 ?3 m. (AVI) S6 Video. Shape changes during cell migration in presence of electrotaxis within a substrate with stiffness gradient. A cell is exposed to a dcEF (E = 100 mV/mm) where the anode is located at x = 0 and the cathode at x = 400 m. It is supposed that the cell is attracted to the cathode pole. At the beginning, the cell is placed near the anode and far from the cathode pole. The cell migrates along the dcEF towards the surface in which the cathode pole is located. Depending on EF strength, the ultimate location of the cell centroid will be different so that in this case (E = 100 mV/mm) the cell centroid keeps moving around an IEP located at x = 383 ?2 m. (AVI)PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0122094 March 30,27 /3D Num. Model of Cell Morphology during Mig. in Multi-Signaling Sub.AcknowledgmentsThe authors gratefully acknowledge the support from the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness and the CIBER-BBN fpsyg.2014.00822 initiative.Author ContributionsConceived and designed the experiments: MHD. Performed the experiments: SJM. Analyzed the data: MHD SJM. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: MHD SJM. Wrote the paper: MHD SJM.
A female’s choice of mate can significantly affect her reproductive success [1]. In social systems that involve no paternal investment other than spermatozoa, females are expected to choose males that confer greater survival and future reproductive success to their offspring (Doravirine manufacturer reviewedPLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0122381 April 29,1 /Mate Choice and Multiple Mating in Antechinusin [1,2]). Females that are permitted to choose mates in captivity may produce greater quality offspring with improved survival, social dominance, larger home ranges, better nest sites and nests [3] and increased attractiveness as mates [4]. Similarly, in the wild, a female’s choice of mate can lead to jir.2013.0113 increased fitness and parasite resistance in offspring [5]. Females in a variety of taxa may choose males based on a number of criteria, including `good’ or compatible genes with a females own genotype, genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) that can offer a reliable olfactory indicator of male health, genetic diversity and quality ([2]), viability genes or genetic relatedness [6,7,8]. While viability genes are often expressed through secondary sexual characteristics, it is less clear how females assess the genetic relatedness or incompatibility of potential mates and how this affects the siring success of individual males [6,1,9,10]. Such information is lacking for numerous species and the mechanisms for multiple mate selection and the effects of female mate preferences on siring success are still poorly understood. Females mate with more than one male during a single oestrus in a range of species (e.g. common shrews, Sorex araneus [11]; Gunnison’s prairie dogs, Cynomys gunnisoni, [12]; agile antechinus, Antechinus agilis, [13,14]; feathertail gliders, Acrobates pygmaeus, [15], saltmarsh sparrow.Ll is exposed to a dcEF (E = 10 mV/mm) where the anode is located at x = 0 and the cathode at x = 400 m. It is supposed that the cell is attracted to the cathode pole. At the beginning, the cell is placed near the anode and far from the cathode pole. The cell migrates along the dcEF towards the surface in which the cathode pole is located. Depending on EF strength, the ultimate location of the cell centroid will be different so that in this case (E = 10 mV/mm) the cell centroid keeps moving around an IEP located at x = 379 ?3 m. (AVI) S6 Video. Shape changes during cell migration in presence of electrotaxis within a substrate with stiffness gradient. A cell is exposed to a dcEF (E = 100 mV/mm) where the anode is located at x = 0 and the cathode at x = 400 m. It is supposed that the cell is attracted to the cathode pole. At the beginning, the cell is placed near the anode and far from the cathode pole. The cell migrates along the dcEF towards the surface in which the cathode pole is located. Depending on EF strength, the ultimate location of the cell centroid will be different so that in this case (E = 100 mV/mm) the cell centroid keeps moving around an IEP located at x = 383 ?2 m. (AVI)PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0122094 March 30,27 /3D Num. Model of Cell Morphology during Mig. in Multi-Signaling Sub.AcknowledgmentsThe authors gratefully acknowledge the support from the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness and the CIBER-BBN fpsyg.2014.00822 initiative.Author ContributionsConceived and designed the experiments: MHD. Performed the experiments: SJM. Analyzed the data: MHD SJM. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: MHD SJM. Wrote the paper: MHD SJM.
A female’s choice of mate can significantly affect her reproductive success [1]. In social systems that involve no paternal investment other than spermatozoa, females are expected to choose males that confer greater survival and future reproductive success to their offspring (reviewedPLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0122381 April 29,1 /Mate Choice and Multiple Mating in Antechinusin [1,2]). Females that are permitted to choose mates in captivity may produce greater quality offspring with improved survival, social dominance, larger home ranges, better nest sites and nests [3] and increased attractiveness as mates [4]. Similarly, in the wild, a female’s choice of mate can lead to jir.2013.0113 increased fitness and parasite resistance in offspring [5]. Females in a variety of taxa may choose males based on a number of criteria, including `good’ or compatible genes with a females own genotype, genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) that can offer a reliable olfactory indicator of male health, genetic diversity and quality ([2]), viability genes or genetic relatedness [6,7,8]. While viability genes are often expressed through secondary sexual characteristics, it is less clear how females assess the genetic relatedness or incompatibility of potential mates and how this affects the siring success of individual males [6,1,9,10]. Such information is lacking for numerous species and the mechanisms for multiple mate selection and the effects of female mate preferences on siring success are still poorly understood. Females mate with more than one male during a single oestrus in a range of species (e.g. common shrews, Sorex araneus [11]; Gunnison’s prairie dogs, Cynomys gunnisoni, [12]; agile antechinus, Antechinus agilis, [13,14]; feathertail gliders, Acrobates pygmaeus, [15], saltmarsh sparrow.

Leave a Reply