Seline levels), intubation, vasopressors, or in-hospital mortality. Results: We identified 1,156 patients
Seline levels), intubation, vasopressors, or in-hospital mortality. Results: We identified 1,156 patients with PI and excluded 324. Of the remaining, 304 did not have lactate measurements, leaving 528 for the analysis: 302 septic, 46 cardiogenic, 29 hemorrhagic, 57 hypovolemic, and 94 with another cause of instability. The differences in lactate levels between groups were not statistically significant (Figure 1). The lactate levels were statistically different between patients who deteriorated when compared with patients who did not deteriorate in the sepsis group (3.05 mmol/l vs. 1.91 mmol/l, P < 0.0001) and the other group (2.89 mmol/l vs. 1.94 mmol/l, P = 0.002). No statistically significant differences were demonstrated for the cardiogenic, the hemorrhagic or the hypovolemic groups (Figure 2). Conclusions: Lactate levels were not significantly different between the five groups with PI. However, in patients in the sepsis or other group, elevated lactate predicted deterioration. This was not demonstrated for the other causes of PI. This study suggests that in unstable patients lactate has the same likelihood of elevation between different causes of instability, but it may not have the same prognostic value for deterioration across underlying causes. Acknowledgements: CONSIDER Sepsis Network is a collaboration of clinical researchers with an interest in sepsis at Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. References 1. Jones AE, Aborn LS, Kline JA: Severity of emergency department hypotension predicts adverse hospital outcome. Shock 2004, 22:410-414. 2. Jones AE, Stiell IG, Nesbitt LP, Spaite DW, Hasan N, Watts BA, Kline JA: Nontraumatic out-of-hospital hypotension predicts inhospital mortality. Ann Emerg Med 2004, 43:106-113. 3. Sebat F, PubMed ID:https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27532042 Musthafa Aa, Johnson D, Kramer Aa, Shoffner D, Eliason M, Henry K, Spurlock B: Effect of a rapid response system for patients in shock on time to treatment and mortality during 5 years. Crit Care Med 2007, 35:2568-2575. 4. Shapiro NI, Howell MD, Talmor D, Nathanson LA, Wolfe RE, Weiss JW: Serum lactate as a predictor of mortality in emergency department patients with infection. 2005, 45:524-528. 5. Trichostatin AMedChemExpress TSA Vermeulen RP, Hoekstra M, Nijsten MW, van der Horst IC, van Pelt LJ, Jessurun Ga, Jaarsma T, Zijlstra F, van den Heuvel AF: Clinical correlates of arterial lactate levels in patients with ST-segment elevationmyocardial infarction at admission: a descriptive study. Crit Care 2010, 14:R164.P26 Rapid molecular test (SeptiFast? reduced time for adjustment of antibiotic treatment in comparison with conventional blood cultures in critically ill sepsis patients: a randomized controlled clinical trial (preliminary results) Cristhieni Rodrigues1*, Mirlane Silva dos Santos2, Helio Hehl Caiaffa Filho2, Cecilia Eug ia Charbel2, Luciane de Carvalho Sarahyba da Silva2, Fl ia Rossi3, Maria Renata Gomes Franco3, Rinaldo Focaccia Siciliano1, T ia Mara Varej Strabelli1 1 Infection Control Unit, Heart Institute (InCor), University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 2Molecular Biology Branch, Central Laboratory Division, University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 3 Central Laboratory Division, University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil Critical Care 2013, PubMed ID:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25432023 17(Suppl 4):P26; doi:10.1186/cc12926 Background: Sepsis is the main cause of death in ICUs all over the world. Early detection of the pathogen is essential for appropriate antimicrobial treatment. Materials and methods: To evalua.

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